Diá de la Independencia

It looked like a walking flock of blue and white flags of every size fluttering on the nearby street corner. I had just arrived in Antigua, had breakfast and I was off to explore the city. There must be a person in there somewhere. Eventually I saw a head pop up as he turned around. I actually wasn’t sure if these were Guatemalan flags that he was selling since I couldn’t recall ever seeing one. Or I wondered whether these could be flags for some other purpose. Was an anti-government protest in the making? Was soccer fever in the air? Maybe it was just Guatemalan patriotism so I kept walking and exploring, and I didn’t think much more about it.

As the days went by, I continued seeing these flag vendors occasionally in the streets. So I asked the next vendor that I saw about it but I coudn’t understand exactly what he was trying so say. “Diá de Independencia, diá de independencia.”  I struggled to understand.  I knew he wasn’t saying “oil can.” I heard “Independencia?” Oh, independence. Was this about seeking independence from what many people here believe to be a corrupt govenment? Could the Guatemalan Independence Day be coming up or was he talking about something else?  I really wasn’t sure. So of course, I googled it. And I asked the family that I was living with about it too.  Sure enough, I soon realized that the Guatemalan Diá de la Independencia (Independence Day) would be celebrated the upcoming Friday and Saturday, September 14 and 15th. What luck! I couldn’t have timed my arrival in Antigua any better. I had no idea.

There was going to be a two day celebration beginning on Friday and continuing all day on Saturday and into the evening. I then started to hear something about the torch runners but I wasn’t sure what they were talking about. However, during the days leading up to the holiday, I started seeing groups of mostly youngish guys running through the city streets making lots of noise.  

Runners in Antigua, Guatemala in Preparation for Independence Day. Photo by Steve Karbelnig, all rights reserved

I stood and watched one of the groups run by and it seemed to be good-natured fun and a chance to be a little rowdy. Guatemalans seem to like noise. I also found it hard to believe that they were actually running on the cobblestone streets since it can be so difficult to just try and walk on them! The family  that I’m living with told me that the running of the torches is part of the celebration but they didn’t seem to like the idea and thought it was somewhat dangerous. They were probably right. 

Doing a little Goggle research, as I tend to do when I’m curious, I learned that the torch represents the “the flame of liberty.” “La Antorcha” commemorates the independence from Spain on September 15, 1821 of Guatemala, and several other Central American countries including Costa Rica, El Salvador, Honduras, and Nicaragua. Carrying the torch through the streets represents the night before the historic day when riders at full gallop went through all of these Central American countries carrying the news of independence, proclaimed in Guatemala with the signing of an act by civil and religious authorities. Also on that night, independence hero, Maria Delores Bedoya, ran through the streets of Guatemala caring a lantern as a symbol of hope for the nations liberated. Now, the running of the torch preserves the tradition, and modern day participants seem to have lots of fun carrying the torch, making noise and trying not to set things on fire or sprain their ankles on the cobblestone streets of Antigua. 

During the days leading up to the holiday, there were lots of firecrackers going off (more than usual) and there seemed to be a buzz of excitement and anticipation in the air.  I noticed flags being hung all over the city’s buildings and they were flown in other places as well. I heard that there would be more torch runners and that there would be parades on Friday night and Saturday during the day and evening.  

I had just started the Spanish immersion program a few days earlier on Monday just after I arrived in Antigua. The school invited everyone to a  fiesta at the school that upcoming Friday to celebrate Diá de la Independencia. The fiesta was actually very nice. There was a  large marimba band playing while local foods and drinks were served. Watching the marimba players was fascinating and the music was great. Marimba bands are extremely popular here in Guatemala.

Marimba Band at Christian Spanish Academy, Antigua, Guatemala. Photo by Steve Karbelnig, all rights reserved

And once you’ve had a chance to watch and hear one of these bands, you can easily see why. They’re wonderful. There’s something about marimba music that just makes you feel good. The coordination among the many musicians is really impressive to watch and even more impressive was the fact that the songs they play are fairly long yet none of the musicians were reading music-it was all memorized. As part of the celebration, they sang the national anthem which is actually quite long and has numerous stanzas. I enjoyed hearing the many voices as the local students and teachers sang with pride for their country. The speakers talked about the inaccurate reputation of their country and how it actually has many good qualities along with its vast beauty.

The food was interesting and tasty, mostly finger foods with the sauces made from tomatoes, tomatillos, cheese and avocado. They had chicharrónes (fried pork skin) which seems to be a Latin favorite. I passed- I’ve had them before. With some of the foods, I wasn’t completely sure what I was eating but it was all really flavorful. They also served the rice-based cold drink, horchata, that is sweet and tastes of cinnamon or other spices which I found quite refreshing. I ate with one of the teachers and a pleasant middle aged couple who were learning Spanish to help with their missionary work. They apparently go to many countries especially in Latin American and carry the word of Jesús to the indigenous people living there. They uniquely use puppets and costumes to do their work which creates lots of attention and attracts lots of people. 

Walking home after school, I continued to feel the energy and mounting excitement all around me. After dinner, I walked to the central park square. The evening parade had already begun and seemed fairly short, comprised mostly of musical bands of school age kids.

Marimba Band for Independence Day, Antigua Guatemala. Photo by Steve Karbelnig, all rights reserved.

There was a big marimba band playing in the corner of the park with colorful spotlights making the area very festive. The music was great but the thumping bass was so loud, I could feel my insides vibrating. I saw a couple of torch runners run by in small groups attracting lots of attention and some cheers. I also saw some motorcycle riders getting ready to carry there torches on their motorcycles through the city’s streets.

Torch Runner, Antigua Guatemala. Photo by Steve Karbelnig, All rights reserved

I found myself somewhat on edge as I anticipated the loud deafening boom of the next firecracker that I was sure would go off any second. It did and I jumped-of course! And then there was another. And then another.

Motorcycles Get Ready for Torch Ride, Antigua Guatemala. Photo by Steve Karbelnig, All rights reserved.

The following morning, I got up early to make sure that I had a good spot on the parade route. The parade started at the central park punctually at 8 AM. It was an amazing assortment of marching bands, a firetruck, dancers, people in masks and on stilts, people wearing traditional Guatemalan clothing and of course baton twirlers. 

Independence Day Parade, Antigua Guatemala. Photo by Steve Karbelnig, all rights reserved.

I loved watching the parade but I also enjoyed watching the crowd along with the colorful street vendors selling everything from parasols-it was sunny that day-multi-colored cotton candy, inflatable and other types of toys, balloons, bubble blowers and many types of sweet and savory food treats. 

Inflatable Turtles for Sale, Antigua Guatemala. Photo by Steve Karbelnig, All rights reserved

The parade lasted for four hours. Yep, four hours!  I stayed the entire time since I didn’t want to miss anything. As things seemed to wind down, I decided to walk to Cerro de la Cruz (Hill of the cross), where a large oversized 1930’s cross sits on a hill directly north and right in the middle of Antigua. On the way, I ended up walking through an interesting neighborhood that reminded me of some of the hilly neighborhoods around Silver Lake or Los Feliz in Los Angeles.  I climbed the many steps to get up the hill marveling at the work that must have gone into making them. It was a pretty walk through a very green and heavy wooded area which took roughly 15 minutes.

View of Antigua from Hill of the Cross, Antigua Guatemala. Photo by Steve Karbelnig, all rights reserved.

The climb was well-worth it as the view was incredible! The entire city of Antigua was visible along with dramatic backdrop of the inactive Volcán de Agua in the distance directly south. There were numerous street vendors there as well (of course). While I was up there, I met a nice couple from the U.S. and their Guatemalan daughter. The mom and daughter ended up being students at my school. 

By then, it was already getting late in the afternoon and the sky of dark clouds was threatening rain. As I came back down through the city streets, to my surprise, I intercepted the bands again from the parade and some of the dancers.

Independence Day Parade, Antigua Guatemala. Photo by Steve Karbelnig, all rights reserved.

Apparently, all of the participants in the parade had marched up to the local stadium. And evidently, they were now doing the parade in reverse back to the central park! I found myself direcly on the route of the parade as it was returning. While I watched for a while, I decided to head back down to the park which was packed with people by the time I arrived. Some of the bands were surrounding the park and all of these bands were playing their different songs at the same time.

It was a cacophony of  unrecognizable loud musical mush of brass instruments, xylophones and drums. This went on for quite some time. And it was loud.  

Eventually, the bands got quieter as some politicians who had gathered on a prefab stage in the park started to speak. The whole crowd sang the national anthem which went on for several minutes given its length. I enjoyed hearing the many voices in surround sound singing the pleasant sounding anthem in unison.

Independence Day Parade, Antigua Guatemala. Photo by Steve Karbelnig, all rights reserved.

I felt a little self-conscious not  joining them but of course I didn’t know the tune or the words. When a female politician began speaking at the podium, the people in attendance started to boo but I had no idea why. In fact, I wasn’t initially sure that they were actually booing.

Nonetheless, it had been a long day and it was starting to lightly rain so I decided to leave. As I was walking away, I asked a couple of local Guatemalan guys why the people were making noise. Apparently, it was booing. The woman was the mayor of Antigua and she evidently had done some things regarding water rights impacting Antigua that had angered  a lot of people. (Sounds a bit like California.) As I got further away, I continued to hear the booing of the crowd intercepted by an occasional smack of a firecracker that split the air. And of course, I jumped. The following photos capture more of my amazing day. It was such a great unexpected surprise to have arrived in Antigua just in time to experience the wonderful celebration of the Guatemala’s Diá de la Independencia.

Independence Day Parade, Antigua Guatemala. Photo by Steve Karbelnig, all rights reserved.
Independence Day Parade, Antigua Guatemala. Photo by Steve Karbelnig, all rights reserved.
Independence Day Parade, Antigua Guatemala. Photo by Steve Karbelnig, all rights reserved.
Independence Day Parade, Antigua, Guatemala. Photo by Steve Karbelnig, all rights reserved
Independence Day Parade, Antigua Guatemala. Photo by Steve Karbelnig, all rights reserved.
Independence Day Parade, Antigua Guatemala. Photo by Steve Karbelnig, all rights reserved.
Independence Day Parade, Antigua Guatemala. Photo by Steve Karbelnig, all rights reserved.
Independence Day Parade, Antigua Guatemala. Photo by Steve Karbelnig, all rights reserved.
Independence Day Parade, Antigua Guatemala. Photo by Steve Karbelnig, all rights reserved.
Independence Day Parade, Antigua Guatemala. Photo by Steve Karbelnig, all rights reserved.
Independence Day Parade, Antigua Guatemala. Photo by Steve Karbelnig, all rights reserved.
Independence Day Parade, Antigua Guatemala. Photo by Steve Karbelnig, all rights reserved.
Independence Day Parade, Antigua Guatemala. Photo by Steve Karbelnig, all rights reserved.
Independence Day Parade, Antigua Guatemala. Photo by Steve Karbelnig, all rights reserved.
Independence Day Parade, Antigua Guatemala. Photo by Steve Karbelnig, all rights reserved.
Independence Day Parade, Antigua Guatemala. Photo by Steve Karbelnig, all rights reserved.
Independence Day Parade, Antigua Guatemala. Photo by Steve Karbelnig, all rights reserved.
Independence Day Parade, Antigua Guatemala. Photo by Steve Karbelnig, all rights reserved.
Independence Day Parade, Antigua Guatemala. Photo by Steve Karbelnig, all rights reserved.
Independence Day Parade, Antigua Guatemala. Photo by Steve Karbelnig, all rights reserved.
Independence Day Parade, Antigua Guatemala. Photo by Steve Karbelnig, all rights reserved.
Independence Day Parade, Antigua Guatemala. Photo by Steve Karbelnig, all rights reserved.